Aerobic Rehabilitation

I am going into a slight aerobic periodization/rehabilitation phase. Maximum speeds and 1 rep max lifts, will now be tied to longer time frames — maximum effort will not be sacrificed.   This means more anaerobic glycolysis. Hamstrings, soleus and gastrocnemius will have to quiet down, before going at maximal intensities. Today, I rode my bike as hard as I could 50 minutes, no matter how hard I cycle, it doesn’t jack up my heart rate as much as running does or cross country skiing. Even though I train for speed, power and strength, my walking around heart rate is 53 to 55. Obviously my resting HR is lower than that.

Edward Troy

http://www.aspenvipinternational.com

2 Days After 5th Highest Colorado Mountain Ascent:

So at age 54 and weight ranging from 200 to 205 lbs., it was time to train with some of my clients. I want them to see that they can be more fit than me, when they get to be my age. We did some heavy bag training to warm up, did a few sprints and some power clean and jerks. I managed to to do six repetitions at 155 and three at 175. I did notice that my legs while sprinting felt dead or leaden — so I did not open up. I did form running at about 70% of maximum effort. My benching was very disappointing about 12.5% lower than my max. I could only do 205 once. Oddly the effects of the Peak Push up La Plata Peak (14336 ft.) a 14er, left me with power, but not much speed or maximal strength. Different muscle fibers do different things. So within the spectrum of speed-power-strength, there might be  slight qualitative differences in the fibers that are responsible for those actions, all still are type IIb (using the older and much more familiar muscle fiber classification system; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skeletal_muscle) quick twitch muscle fibers (new classification is IIx, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skeletal_muscle. Today there will be more sprints and lifting. The soreness is mostly gone. My question as a personal trainer is how can I increase contractile speed of my muscle mass. The obvious answer is selective and specific training of the correct muscle fibers and the correct muscle groups to do what I want to do.

For more traini…

Aside

For more training information go to http://www.aspenvipinternational.com

Edward Troy reporting; 7/21/2012, we started Peak Push, an informal gathering to hike up non technical 14ers in Colorado, and maybe some other local hikes and climbs up lesser peaks and passes. Peak Push is for a select group of people, active and inactive clients. The peak we hiked is La Plata, the 5th highest mountain in Colorado at 14336ft. I have already done the highest — Mt Elbert. This 4136ft. (total elevation gain is even higher) ascent took me 3 hours and ten minutes, carrying a 40 lb pack. I always carry enough water for 2 people — just in case. My friend, Scott, former coworker and now client who has incorporated speed training in his marathon and ultra endurance training, was easily able to outdistance me, as expected. He has knocked 22 minutes off his marathon time. Scott summited in 2:30. If I had taken a daypack with water for me only, I believe I could have taken 20 minutes off my time, but no more.

14er Peak Push Endurance Challenges For The Speed And Power Athlete

For more training information go to http://www.aspenvipinternational.com

Edward Troy reporting; 7/21/2012, we started Peak Push, an informal gathering to hike up non technical 14ers in Colorado, and maybe some other local hikes and climbs up lesser peaks and passes. Peak Push is for a select group of people, active and inactive clients. The peak we hiked is La Plata, the 5th highest mountain in Colorado at 14336ft. I have already done the highest — Mt Elbert. This 4136ft. (total elevation gain is even higher) ascent took me 3 hours and ten minutes, carrying a 40 lb pack. I always carry enough water for 2 people — just in case. My friend, Scott, former coworker and now client who has incorporated speed training in his marathon and ultra endurance training, was easily able to outdistance me, as expected. He has knocked 22 minutes off his marathon time. Scott summited in 2:30. If I had taken a daypack with water for me only, I believe I could have taken 20 minutes off my time, but no more.

14er Peak Push Endurance Challenges For The Speed And Power Athlete

For more training information go to http://www.aspenvipinternational.com

Edward Troy reporting; 7/21/2012, we started Peak Push, an informal gathering to hike up non technical 14ers in Colorado, and maybe some other local hikes and climbs up lesser peaks and passes. Peak Push is for a select group of people, active and inactive clients. The peak we hiked is La Plata, the 5th highest mountain in Colorado at 14336ft. I have already done the highest — Mt Elbert. This 4136ft. (total elevation gain is even higher) ascent took me 3 hours and ten minutes, carrying a 40 lb pack. I always carry enough water for 2 people — just in case. My friend, Scott, former coworker and now client who has incorporated speed training in his marathon and ultra endurance training, was easily able to outdistance me, as expected. He has knocked 22 minutes off his marathon time. Scott summited in 2:30. If I had taken a daypack with water for me only, I believe I could have taken 20 minutes off my time, but no more.

If you are a speed and power athlete or simply train for speed and power, do you have endurance athletes challenging your fitness levels? This happens in my line of work — I am a personal trainer. I don’t buy into the metabolic training modalities, because the lack of recovery prevents peaking efforts in the speed-power-strength continuum. My methods produce greater muscularity in mass and quality than either, metabolic training or straight steady state aerobic exercise, while making small sacrifices in aerobic abilities on per unit of mass basis. In some ways, absolute aerobic capacity may be even higher, due to greater muscle mass.

In the 5 mile Boogie race in Aspen I was able to sustain a heart rate in the mid160s for more than 35 minutes. 220 – 54 = 166. Wait! Isn’t that the maximum heart rate for my age? Not for a long time. All of my students after training with me are able to sustain heart rates above that old guideline; mine is currently in the mid 180s, matching the abilities of those in their twenties. For this much longer test, starting 2000ft higher in altitude and going more than 6000 ft higher, with greater mileage, I did not wear a heart rate monitor. After training with me, and with a heart rate monitor for a couple of months, my students and I can generally tell, from perceived exertion, where their heart rate is. I am sure my rate went into the 170s, out of necessity, but I kept it in the 150s most of the way. Scott was able to keep his far lower and he did wear a monitor. Scott and I now have a heart rate safety margin; through training we have raised our redlines. Scott is discovering hidden potential in his effort to become a really good endurance athlete, by adding maximum anaerobic effort to his already sufficient Long Slow Distance (LSD) training. I expect a break out year from Scott next year.

twitter AVIPprimalPT

T3 training responding to endurance challenges

Recently, my training methods were challenged, with the assumption that one can’t train for speed and power and perform reasonably well, or finish endurance oriented events. I freely admit, that at age 54 and weighing 200 – 205, I am not a world beater, when it comes to endurance oriented events. But don’t take me or those that I train lightly, when it comes down to your endurance oriented events. I use sprints up to 200 meters, power clean and jerks, and heavy bag training, as the core of my training. My T3 training allows even my endurance athletes to improve their performances, because we push heart rates up very high – where training benefits begin. In the Boogie 5 mile race in Aspen Colorado altitude 8214 ft., I managed a 44:14, placing me in the top 20% without running more than 800 meters this year and not running, including sprinting, on average, more than once a week.

It is highly unlikely, that any finishers of this race in front of me, are able to power clean and jerk 175 four times,135 fifteen times and sprint a 200 in under 30 seconds. It is almost certain that very few behind me can do that either. For more insight and information go to http://www.aspenvipinternational.com.

AVIP Fitness Out Of Aspen

This blog is for most things related to fitness, health, athletic development, competition, outdoor adventures, weight loss, fitness products, and activities requiring some level of prepared fitness where you have been or are working out, and is linked to my website http://www.aspenvipinternational.com. While I currently have very limited availability, I do want to share some relevant fitness tips and strategies for your goals. Yes, I want to gift you with fitness you can attain and enjoy.